Teton National Forest
Park Overview
Located in Western Wyoming, the Bridger-Teton offers more than 3.4 million acres of public land for your outdoor recreation enjoyment. With its pristine watersheds, abundant wildlife and immense wildlands, the Bridger-Teton National Forest comprises a large part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem - the largest intact ecosystem in the lower 48 United States. Offering nearly 1.2 million acres of designated Wilderness, over 3,000 miles of road and trail and thousands of miles of unspoiled rivers and streams, the Bridger-Teton offers something for everyone. We encourage you to visit this beautiful landscape and experience this unique piece of American Heritage.
Current Weather

Partly Cloudy

34°F

1°C

Humidity 50%
Wind Speed W 23 MPH
Barometer 29.41 in (995.94 mb)
Dewpoint 17°F (-8°C)
Visibility 10.00 mi
Wind Chill22°F (-6°C)
Last update 26 Feb 05:16 PM MST
Nature of the Area
The Bridger-Teton national Forest supports six species of amphibians, six species of reptiles, 74 species of mammals, 355 species of birds, and 25 species of fish. Wild animals survive because they have learned where and how to find food, where to rest and sleep in safety, and where to raise their families. Getting too close to wildlife can be dangerous. Observe animals from a distance without disturbing them.

A fed animal is a dead animal. Wild animals should never be fed human food; it is bad for their health. Animals dependent upon handouts can lose their ability to find their own natural food and often die when winter comes and no one feeds them.

Fishing and Hunting
Fishing:

A Wyoming State Fishing License is required for fishing within the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

World-class angling opportunities include the prospect of catching nine different species of trout within a variety of stream and natural lakes habitats ranging from alpine lakes, large free-flowing rivers, and small spring-fed creeks. Offering fishing opportunities for various cutthroat trout (native), brook trout (non-native), rainbow trout (non-native), brown trout (non-native), golden trout (non-native) and lake trout, the cool clear waters of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are extensive, impressive and highly productive. The southern half of the Bridger-Teton National Forest alone contains over 2,300 miles of stream and 25,000 acres of lakes greater than 5 acres in size with 30 species of native andn non-native fishes.

Working closely with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the Bridger-Teton National Forest is proud of the habitat enhancement and improvement projects implemented along many of the rivers and streams within the Forest boundary. For license requirements, take limits and seasonal closure information; please visit the Wyoming Department of Game and Fish web site. For more information on popular fishing stretches, please click on a desired area of the map.

Hunting:

A Wyoming State Hunting License is required to hunt in the state of Wyoming, including the Bridger-Teton National Forest. The opportunity to hunt big game on public lands has been a part of our American Heritage since the inception of public lands in the early 1900's. This opportunity is beautifully exemplified on the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Western Wyoming. While the Wyoming Department of Game and Fish manages hunting and fishing opportunities, the public lands of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are the favored hunting grounds of many Americans. Having opportunities to hunt deer, elk, moose, antelope, big horn sheep and mountain goat, as well as game bird species such as spotted, blue and ruffed grouse, persons from around the country have come to enjoy the hunting opportunities available on the Bridger-Teton National Forest. For hunting information, license applications and fees, please visit the Wyoming Department of Game and Fish web site.

ATTENTION: All backcountry users, including campers are required to keep a clean camp. As areas of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are occupied by both black bears and grizzly bears, all hunters are encouraged to properly store their food, stock feed and game meat in a way that is inaccessible to bears. Food Storage Requirements are in effect on some portions of the Forest. However, voluntary food storage in areas where it is not required can also prevent unnecessary confrontations between humans and bears, making your visit to the Forest safer for you and healthier for bears. Click here for Food Storage Requirements, Tips and Techniques.

Camping
Camping on the Bridger-Teton National Forest is a great way to spend time with friends and family, while relaxing in some our nations most beautiful country. Offering both developed and dispersed (primitive) camping areas, the Bridger-Teton National Forest offers a diversity of camping experiences. Catering to the most rugged backcountry enthusiast and the typical developed campground user, facilities on the Bridger-Teton are widely varied. However, very few facilities are capable of accommodating large recreational vehicles. Nearly all Bridger-Teton campgrounds are first-come, first-served with a few group sites available for reservations. Most developed facilities are fee based and open from June - September. Average fees are $12.00 per site for a single-family unit (4 persons) and $50.00 for group units (25 persons). For more detailed information on campsites in a given area, please check our Campground Listing or click on your desired destination on the map below.

ATTENTION: All campers are required to keep a clean camp. As areas of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are occupied by both black bears and grizzly bears, all forest users are encouraged to properly store their food in a way that is inaccessible to bears. Food Storage Requirements are in effect on some portions of the Forest. However, voluntary food storage can also prevent unnecessary confrontations between humans and bears, making it safer not only for you but for all others who camp in the area, and of course, healthier for the bears as well.

Trails
Biking:

Mountain biking on the Bridger-Teton National Forest can be exhilarating, but requires riders to behave responsibly. We encourage all mountain bike riders to ride safe and "Share the Trail". These concepts require riders to yield to all other trail users, while paying attention to all Forest Travel Plan requirements. Riders are encouraged to wear appropriate protective gear, carry repair kits and watch for rapidly changing weather conditions. For more information and descriptions of specific trails offered on the Forest, click on an area of the map to the right.

Hiking:

An abundance of trails snaking through the Bridger-Teton National Forest and its three designated Wilderness Areas provide backcountry enthusiasts a level of solitude difficult to find anywhere else in the United States. Trails of all ability levels exist, from an easy stroll up Cache Creek in Jackson or a difficult climb up Gannet Peak in the Wind River Range near Pinedale. Trail guides and Forest Maps are available from the Grand Teton Natural History Association. For information and descriptions of specific trails in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, please click a location on the map.

Horseback Riding:

Horses and other pack animals are allowed on all Forest trails. However, not all trail are designed for stock. Some trails may be too steep or narrow to accommodate horses, pack mules and even llamas. Some portions of the Forest require permits for stock use and may require you to pack feed into the area. When packing stock feed, certified, weed-free hay or pellets is required. Please follow proper picketing procedures to prevent resource damage. Brochures for proper picketing procedures is available online and from all Forest offices. Stock is not permitted in developed campgrounds unless facilities have been provided. Public corrals are available near several trailheads. For information and descriptions of specific trails in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, please click a location on the map.

ATTENTION: All backcountry users are required to keep a clean camp. As areas of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are occupied by both black bears and grizzly bears, all forest users are encouraged to properly store their food, including stock feed, in a way that is inaccessible to bears. Food Storage Requirements are in effect on some portions of the Forest. However, voluntary food storage in areas where it is not required can also prevent unnecessary confrontations between humans and bears, making your visit to the Forest safer for you and healthier for bears.

Boating
Rafting, Kayaking, and Canoeing:

Many of the lakes and rivers within the Bridger-Teton National Forest are navigable. Many stretches are known for the wild and scenic qualities, their world-class fishing or their intense whitewater excitement. Launch facilities are located on many of the more popular stretches of water, with some lakes offering facilities for larger, motorized craft. Regardless of your boating interest however, the Bridger-Teton National Forest has something for you. If considering a boating trip to the Bridger-Teton National Forest, make sure you have all the proper boating safety equipment; necessary permits and appropriate skill level for the type of water you are navigating. For specific boating opportunities within the Forest, please click on a desired location of the Map.

ATTENTION: All campers are required to keep a clean camp. As areas of the Bridger-Teton National Forest are occupied by both black bears and grizzly bears, all forest users are encouraged to properly store their food in a way that is inaccessible to bears. Food Storage Requirements are in effect in some river canyons on the Forest. However, voluntary food storage can also prevent unnecessary confrontations between humans and bears, making your visit to the Forest safer for you and healthier for bears.

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