Mimosa Rocks National Park
Park Overview
Located not far from Bega on the far south coast of NSW, Mimosa Rocks National Park offers a great camping holiday. Visit today to go fishing or birdwatching. Just a short drive from Bega, Mimosa Rocks National Park offers up show-stopping headland views, beaches and pure lagoons, and you’ll be spoilt for choice with lookouts, rainforest pockets and historic sites to explore.The park takes its name from the Paddle Steamer Mimosa that wrecked in 1863 after running onto rocks at the northern end of the park. The rocks of Mimosa have distinctive castle-like features that are the result of intricate folds, faults and intrusions occurring in the rock. For a view you’ll never forget, head to Bunga Head for sunrise, the rocks look magnificent backed by the pinks of the early morning sky.You’ll also find plenty of opportunities for fishing, surfing, snorkelling and birdwatching throughout the park and there are great picnic areas to stop for a break. The park’s headlands are great vantage points for whale watching in winter.It’s a great place to escape to for the day, and if you’d like to stay for longer, there are a range of campgrounds to choose from, including sites with motorhome and camper trailer access.
Nature of the Area
The park provides refuge for koalas, swamp wallabies and ringtail possums, to name a few. Of an evening at Aragunnu campground, you may not see yellow-bellied gliders flitting between trees, but you might be able to hear their distinctive cackling sound that cuts through the silence of the night. At Gillards campground you may well see a long-nosed potoroo. About the size of a rabbit, they look quite similar to a bandicoot, except that they hop in a similar way to a kangaroo. The potoroo is nocturnal, so you are most likely to see them in the evening. The park is an important stop for many migratory birds that nest along the park’s coastline. Look along the beaches and rock platforms – you may see threatened hooded plovers or pied oystercatchers. The bar-tailed godwit stops by briefly in summer during its migration from Alaska to New Zealand. It’s a well deserved stop off as the bar-tailed godwit makes the longest known non-stop flight of any bird and the longest journey without pausing to feed by any animal. Look for them around the park’s lakes and lagoons.
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